Archive for the ‘Races’ Category

How Much Do Marathon Runners Get Paid?

Image by bignoseduglyguy via Flickr

Image by bignoseduglyguy via Flickr

As I finished a 14-miler last weekend I passed two runners coming in the other direction. These two chaps, virtually sprinting, were about 7 feet tall and didn’t have an ounce of fat on them. If you’d have cooked them up and made a jogger-burger you’d still be chewing the meat a week later. These two were as toned as they come.

I’d manage to finish my 14-mile training run in about 2 hours 10 minutes (not bad going considering I was taking it easy). Who knows at what stage these two runners were. But just from the look of their posture, the length of their stride and the clothes they were wearing you could tell that they were professionals. Or at least ran for more than a hobby.

This got me thinking. How much of a lifestyle change do you have to make to become a professional runner? How much competition is there? What sort of money are we talking for a race win? How fast do you really have to be?

Read the rest of this entry »

http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/digg_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/stumbleupon_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/delicious_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/technorati_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/google_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/myspace_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/facebook_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/twitter_32.png

REVIEW: Lausanne Half Marathon

Lausanne MarathonEvery October since 1992, the city of Lausanne, Switzerland plays host to the Lausanne Marathon. With over 10,000 participants, and a number of different races on the day, the event is set over one of the most stunning backdrops in the world, Lake Geneva and the Swiss Alps.

There are 9 different events to choose from on the day. Obviously the main event is a full marathon, but also available to participate in is a quarter marathon, 10km walk, ‘mini’ races for children and a handcyles half marathon. However, the most popular distance (with over 3000 more entrants than the full marathon) is the half marathon.

The starting point is a 20 minute train journey away from the finish line, in La Tour-de-Peilz, a cool 13.1 miles away. Handily, your running number is your train fare, but the train runs almost side-by-side with the running route, painfully showing you just how far you have to run to reach the finish line back in Lausanne.

Read the rest of this entry »

http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/digg_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/stumbleupon_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/delicious_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/technorati_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/google_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/myspace_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/facebook_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/twitter_32.png

REVIEW: JPMorgan Corporate Challenge

JPMorgan Corporate ChallengeIf you’re a gym-goer who lives in a major city across the globe (London, New York, Frankfurt, Sydney, Singapore or many others), you’ll have undoubtedly seen someone wearing a white t-shirt with ‘JPMorgan Corporate Challenge’ written on the front. If you’re really lucky you may have even spotted someone wearing one that fits them.

On the rare occasion that you actually spot a shirt that hugs the biceps and doesn’t flap around in the air conditioning from your local gym then go over, shake that person’s hand and ask them if they’d like a running partner. The likelihood is that this person has finished the JPMorgan CC in under 24 minutes.

Every year business moguls in their thousands turn up to one of their city’s finest parks to run the JPMorgan Corporate Challenge, an event now over 30 years old and so popular that it boasts nearly a quarter of a million entrants each year across the globe. Part of its popularity is probably down to the length of the race; a manageable 3.5 miles. This gives even the hardest working city trader time to put down his or her Blackberry a couple of times a week to train.

If you’re lucky enough to get a place then the first question you’ll be asked is whether or not you think you can run 3.5 miles in under 21 minutes. If you think you can then you’ll be given a red sticker and, on arrival, you’ll be ushered to the front of the line to be given a relatively clear run to the finish. If you don’t then be prepared for an elbow-jousting scrap for one square-foot of asphalt at every other step.

The start...

The London event is hosted at the beautiful Battersea Park and is a utter schmooze-fest. If you’re a client of one of the corporate giants attending then you’ll be in for plastic glasses and private portaloos. If not, feel free to be intimidated by the size of another company’s hospitality tent and get in the queue for the sub-£5 million-a-year toilets.

It’s a very crowded race once you’ve managed to get over the start line so don’t be expecting to be beating any PBs. You’ll be lucky to get under a minute over your usual time (the London race actually ground to a halt during one bottle-necked corner). The atmosphere makes up for this though. Each year all companies compete in a t-shirt competition and this makes for an interesting read as you progress (this year’s London event was won by Tudor Capital). There’s also an award for the fastest ‘most senior executive’ and, as you can imagine, an incredible amount of money is raised for causes across the globe ($600,000 to charities and even more for not-for-profit organisations).

At the end you’ll get the fabled JPMCC t-shirt and if you’re quick enough, you’ll get one in your size! Wear it with pride.

http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/digg_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/stumbleupon_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/delicious_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/technorati_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/google_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/myspace_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/facebook_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/twitter_32.png

4 tips on how to beat your PB:

Post by Dan Worth

Beating your personal best

Okay, so you’re a competent runner. You’re a 10km pro, perhaps have a few half marathons under you’re belt, and maybe even a marathon and, towards the end you’re usually overtaking – and that makes you feel good. But, when the time comes up after the race, there’s a nagging doubt that perhaps you could be doing better. But how? How can you shave off a few minutes here, some precious seconds there, and start to improve those times? Well, thankfully, here are some tips to help you smash that PB:

  1. Race everything

    You see that other runner plodding along 60 meters away? Yeah? She’s going to win £1,000 instead of you unless you catch her in two minutes. Oh and that tree blowing innocently in the wind? It’s going to fall on you unless you’re past it in under 45 seconds. Basically: find motivation, whatever it is, to make yourself run faster than you need to. Overtake other runners, see how long you can stay ahead of a cyclist coming up behind you, imagine a dog is about to attack you, and so on. Anything you can do to exert extra energy will help you reach a new level of fitness. And it’s fun too. This is essentially the Swedish running style known as Fartlek (Speed Play) and is a good way to have fun, and increase your speed, while out running.

  2. Push yourself

    Perhaps this will sound obvious but you’ve got to push yourself. This though, needn’t mean running like Usian Bolt and sweating more than Lee Evans, it just means easing yourself from a position of comfort while running to one of, well, a bit less comfort. Next time you find yourself ticking along nicely, gradually start to accelerate. Nothing major, but a slow, steady increase, so that after about 200 meters you’re doing a good speed. Now maintain that pace for about three minutes, or as long as you feel comfortable with, and then ease back down to a comfortable pace. Speeding up gradually and then easing back down will help to shift the boundary of your most comfortable running speed to one that’s slightly faster than before.

  3. Time yourself

    Investing in a good watch is a great way to go faster. Being able to accurately record how fast and how far you’re running while out and about provides you with a much better way of being able to assess your ability. And using the Fartlek running style (mentioned above) means you can put a specific speed and/or distance limit on each sprint you do – say, 0.4km at 4.30 minutes per km. Garmin, the most well-known brand, have watches that start at around £60 on Amazon and a little shopping around will help you see what seems best.

  4. Plan your race

    This is the time when you might feel like an obsessive runner. Pick a race that’s flat, on a smooth surface, and avoids laps. Have a good breakfast (and a banana) and make sure you’re there in plenty of time to warm up. The race itself is also something you need to plan. The first 3km could dash any hopes you have if you go too slow or get caught in a crowd, so get to a good position in the start and ensure you begin at the pace you’ve planned for. Through 3km to 8km, you want to find that rhythm you’ve built to in training and stick to it: this is where your fancy watch will come in handy, telling you your exact pace, and alerting you if you’re going to slowly, allowing you to pick up the pace before you fall too far behind. Then over the last two kilometers really push it home, using the adrenaline of the race environment, the knowledge you’re close to home, and the fact you’re about to smash your PB, to really shave off as many seconds, or indeed minutes, as you can. Hopefully, this will see you home in your best time yet; and there’s something intensely satisfying about that.

Only trouble is once… now you’ve set it you’ve got to break it again. Back out on the road you go…

Avoid laps...

Dan Worth writes  for a UK business/trade magazine company, across a range of their titles. He has also written articles for Runners World and The Guardian. You can find his blog at danielworth.blogspot.com. Dan ran the London Marathon in 2009, has a half marathon time of 1 hour 42 minutes and his 10k PB is 42:20.
http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/digg_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/stumbleupon_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/delicious_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/technorati_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/google_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/myspace_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/facebook_32.png http://www.sirjogalot.com/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/twitter_32.png
Categories

100m (1)
10K Races (4)
5K (2)
Blisters (1)
Chafing (5)
Charity (16)
Competition (17)
Fitness (21)
Fundraising (12)
Gait (1)
Half Marathon (3)
Headphones (1)
Health (13)
Hitting the wall (3)
Injury (10)
Jogging (30)
Listening to Music (4)
London Marathon (57)
Motivation (1)
mp3 players (5)
Nutrition (1)
Pacing (3)
PB (3)
Preparation (2)
Professional Running (1)
Races (11)
Recovery (3)
Reviews (11)
Running (29)
Sir Jog A Lot News (5)
Socks (1)
Sports (9)
Trainers (8)
Twitter (1)
Usain Bolt (1)
Video (2)
Weight Loss (5)

WP Cumulus Flash tag cloud by Roy Tanck and Luke Morton requires Flash Player 9 or better.